Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Focus - What it looks like - How to use it

The power of focus is the key to success in all endeavors.  To operate without engaging our focus is at best a waste of time, at worst, it is an instant pass to the hereafter.

In a blog that I called Story Book Endings, I mentioned Evan Gattis. In this blog on focus, Evan is my example.

In the third game of the just completed series against the Dodgers, Gattis, an Atlanta Braves rookie, had not been in the starting lineup for the previous two games.  The Braves were down, 2 - 0, with two men on base, when Gattis was called on to pinch hit.

Stepping to the plate, he looked like a "normal player."  By normal player I mean he wasn't totally focused.  He was maybe 80% present, the other 20% of his focus was being eaten up by the shock of being suddenly being inserted into the line up, before a sell out home crowd, in the face of a almost hopeless situation.


The Dodger pitcher wasted a pitch, then realizing that Gattis wasn't totally ready, delivered two quick strikes, followed by another wasted pitch.  And then a funny thing happened.  The missing 20% of focus began to return to Gattis eyes.  He fouled off three consecutive two strike pitches and after each one the increased focused became more apparent.  Want to know what happened on the eighth pitch of his at bat?  Click the play button below.



Focus is a choice, one that most people aren't willing to make because it requires a total expenditure of energy, leaving no room for hole cards or hold backs.

If you want to win, at whatever you are doing, you must be willing to pay the price, to give all your energy to bring your total focus to the moment.

Update:  Last night, with the Braves trailing the Twins 5-4, with two out in the bottom of the ninth inning, Evan Gattis pinch hit once again: